Summer of Supervillainy

A secret hideout, a werewolf serum, and a dream

156 notes

ami-angelwings:

If you ever think a trans person’s insecurities are too gender essentialist, I suggest you turn your ire on all the asshole cis people that prescribe what makes us male or female, that tied the gender we didn’t want to be growing up to how we acted and what we did and what we wore, that continue to judge us now and misgender us if we don’t wear the right thing or look the right way, that would deny us the right to control our bodies based on us not passing their arbitrary gender role tests.  Rather than telling us that we should magically break free of decades of training us to tie certain things to a gender we hate being assigned and a society that still threatens to strip away our gender based on gender essentialist thinking, work towards changing society and telling cis people to quit doing that shit to us.

3,204 notes

ami-angelwings:

sourcedumal:

georgetakei:

An age test. http://ift.tt/QyEK4c

Looooool

Talking about Chin-Lung Hu, somebody actually made a revamp of the old Abbott and Costello skit using actual modern ballplayers (including Hu, except he’s on second now.)
http://www.redreporter.com/2012/2/13/2796324/hus-on-first-a-modernization
If anybody wants to check it out. :)
(This has been your baseball PSA.  Ami Angelwings: Not Just Escher Girls.)

ami-angelwings:

sourcedumal:

georgetakei:

An age test. http://ift.tt/QyEK4c

Looooool

Talking about Chin-Lung Hu, somebody actually made a revamp of the old Abbott and Costello skit using actual modern ballplayers (including Hu, except he’s on second now.)

http://www.redreporter.com/2012/2/13/2796324/hus-on-first-a-modernization

If anybody wants to check it out. :)

(This has been your baseball PSA.  Ami Angelwings: Not Just Escher Girls.)

Filed under the punning is magnificent for baseball fans and linguists alike

46,081 notes

fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

themightyglamazon:

gehayi:

queenofeden:

perplexingly:

Daughter of a gun (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧ No idea if such a thing existed but surely there had to be girls born on board in the Age of Sail?

*puts on obnoxious historian hat*
*clears throat*
there were actually tons of women and girls on board ships during the age of sail and it’s really cool history that no one!!! ever!!! talks about!!! 
like captains of merchant ships used to bring their wives and children on board for long voyages all the time (and of course there were plenty of well known female pirate ship captains, and women cross-dressing as men, and prostitutes that more people seem to know of)
there’s actually a really amazing story of one woman, Mary Ann Patten who was the wife of the captain of this ship called Neptune’s Car. Captain Patten decided that he wanted her onboard with him and she was super about this and learned all about navigation and sailing and everything. so this one voyage they’re going around the tip of south america when her husband gets sick and is bed ridden with a fever right as the ship sails into one of the worst storms any of the crew had ever seen and it looks like they might lose the ship or have to stop
so you know who takes over??? the first mate??? 
no.
MARY
she took over the whole crew and sailed that ship through freezing water and pack ice and had it coasting smoothly into the san francisco harbour like it was nothing. and she did this all at age 19. while pregnant.
at one point the first mate tried to get the crew to mutiny against her but they all rallied with her and told him to shut the heck up because she obv knew what she was doing.
there’s a great book about women in the age of sail called ‘female tars’ by suzanne stark that i cannot recommend enough and has way more amazing stories and insights about the myriad roles women and girls played aboard ship during that time period.
(sorry i totally didn’t mean to hijack your post i love all of your art and this is gorgeous i just got over excited sorry sorry sorry)

We need links!
Female Tars: Women Aboard Ship in the Age of Sail by Suzanne Stark
Hen Frigates: Passion and Peril, Nineteenth-Century Women at Sea by Joan Druett
Hen Frigates: Wives of Merchant Captains Under Sail by Joan Druett
Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Seafaring in the Atlantic World, 1700-1920 edited by Margaret S. Creighton and Lisa Norling
Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920 by Joan Druett
Sea Queens: Women Pirates Around the World by Jane Yolen
Seafaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailors’ Wives by David Cordingly
The Captain’s Best Mate: The Journal of Mary Chipman Lawrence on the Whaler Addison, 1856-1860 by Mary Chipman Lawrence
Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly

I’M GONNA GET A LIBRARY CARD AS SOON AS I GET AN APARTMENT AND READ LITERALLY ALL OF THESE AND WEEP TEARS OF PROUD SISTERHOOD

deannawol:

Just a word of warning:  Sefaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailor’ Wives by David Cordingly and Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly are the same book.  I made that mistake and now own 2 copies of the same book under different publishing houses.  Literally no revisions between them.  It was also published under the name “Heroines and Harlots: Women at Sea in the Great Age of Sail”.

Reblogging for additional commentary

fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

themightyglamazon:

gehayi:

queenofeden:

perplexingly:

Daughter of a gun (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧ No idea if such a thing existed but surely there had to be girls born on board in the Age of Sail?

*puts on obnoxious historian hat*

*clears throat*

there were actually tons of women and girls on board ships during the age of sail and it’s really cool history that no one!!! ever!!! talks about!!! 

like captains of merchant ships used to bring their wives and children on board for long voyages all the time (and of course there were plenty of well known female pirate ship captains, and women cross-dressing as men, and prostitutes that more people seem to know of)

there’s actually a really amazing story of one woman, Mary Ann Patten who was the wife of the captain of this ship called Neptune’s Car. Captain Patten decided that he wanted her onboard with him and she was super about this and learned all about navigation and sailing and everything. so this one voyage they’re going around the tip of south america when her husband gets sick and is bed ridden with a fever right as the ship sails into one of the worst storms any of the crew had ever seen and it looks like they might lose the ship or have to stop

so you know who takes over??? the first mate??? 

no.

MARY

she took over the whole crew and sailed that ship through freezing water and pack ice and had it coasting smoothly into the san francisco harbour like it was nothing. and she did this all at age 19. while pregnant.

at one point the first mate tried to get the crew to mutiny against her but they all rallied with her and told him to shut the heck up because she obv knew what she was doing.

there’s a great book about women in the age of sail called ‘female tars’ by suzanne stark that i cannot recommend enough and has way more amazing stories and insights about the myriad roles women and girls played aboard ship during that time period.

(sorry i totally didn’t mean to hijack your post i love all of your art and this is gorgeous i just got over excited sorry sorry sorry)

We need links!

Female Tars: Women Aboard Ship in the Age of Sail by Suzanne Stark

Hen Frigates: Passion and Peril, Nineteenth-Century Women at Sea by Joan Druett

Hen Frigates: Wives of Merchant Captains Under Sail by Joan Druett

Iron Men, Wooden Women: Gender and Seafaring in the Atlantic World, 1700-1920 edited by Margaret S. Creighton and Lisa Norling

Petticoat Whalers: Whaling Wives at Sea, 1820-1920 by Joan Druett

Sea Queens: Women Pirates Around the World by Jane Yolen

Seafaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailors’ Wives by David Cordingly

The Captain’s Best Mate: The Journal of Mary Chipman Lawrence on the Whaler Addison, 1856-1860 by Mary Chipman Lawrence

Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly

I’M GONNA GET A LIBRARY CARD AS SOON AS I GET AN APARTMENT AND READ LITERALLY ALL OF THESE AND WEEP TEARS OF PROUD SISTERHOOD

deannawol:

Just a word of warning:  Sefaring Women: Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways and Sailor’ Wives by David Cordingly and Women Sailors and Sailors’ Women: An Untold Maritime History by David Cordingly are the same book.  I made that mistake and now own 2 copies of the same book under different publishing houses.  Literally no revisions between them.  It was also published under the name “Heroines and Harlots: Women at Sea in the Great Age of Sail”.

Reblogging for additional commentary

(via anotherwordformyth)

Filed under let's just bookmark this for later

335 notes

c-is-for-circinate:

I think I finally put my finger on what bothers me about all the tons of meta discussing how Mako Mori is really the main character of Pacific Rim.

It’s the same reason I like but am sort of uncomfortable at the idea that Pepper is the hero in IM3, and Natasha in Cap2.  And I do like it, don’t get me wrong—or at least, I sort of like it.  And I’m sort of made really sad.

I am sick of stealth heroines.  I’m sick of the idea that yes, this girl is the center of this movie, but you need an essay to figure that out.  And I’m kind of sick of pretending like we’ve discovered some secret feminist truth in these movies, that of course the main arcs belong to Mako, and Pepper, and Natasha, that this is the way the movie is framed and that’s all there is to it.  Because it’s not.  That’s not all there is to it at all.

Here’s the thing: there are many ways to make a character the hero of the story.  One of these ways is via plot arc.  These ladies get heroic plot arcs, yes, but if you ask the average moviegoing audience member who the main character, the hero of any of those movies is, that’s not what they’re going to say.  And no, we can’t just wave off the average moviegoing audience because they’re blinded by what they expect to see, because they’re not aware enough to have read the same meta essays as us. There are reasons.

There are reasons it reads like Raleigh is the main character of Pacific Rim, and it’s because that’s how the movie is presented to us.  We get huge swathes of the movie from his POV.  We get the beginning of the movie from his POV.

We get Raleigh’s tragic backstory right there with him, as it happens, we’re with him in that.  We get Mako’s in flashback.  We find it out, we discover it, as Raleigh does.  We come to her from the outside and learn our way in, whereas we start on the inside with Raleigh and stay there the whole time.  That’s the difference between the framing of a main character and a second lead.

I think I’m just tired, you know?  Of seeing analyses that put female characters’ arcs front and center that ignore the fact that the movie itself didn’t.  Did Natasha make the big heroic sacrifice here, did she change the most, did she have the really important arc in this movie?  Yeah, she did.  But she had it all in the background, in passing dialogue and in action scenes, with none of the quiet moments that Steve got to help build his story along.

It’s continually fascinating to me how stories show focus, what they do, how they center one character and not another.  I don’t think we meta about it enough.  I don’t think we talk enough about how shows and movies distinguish which characters we’re with, on the inside, and which we’re watching from across the room.  What are the subtle hints used to say ‘this character is a factor in how events progress’ vs ‘this character is a person’?  And these hints are every bit as important as isolating plot arcs, in determining who’s central to a story and who’s not.

Mako’s a person, but one we’re trying to figure out, not one we start with, not one we’re inside of.  Pepper’s a person, but we get her victory through Tony’s eyes, not her own.  Natasha’s a person, but we only get hints and the brief moment of fingers stilling on a keyboard to tell us how much this means to her.

And I want to talk about what that means more.

(via anotherwordformyth)

Filed under exactly

39 notes

fuckyeahdiomedes:

surfshoggoth:

but what about an action movie where the hero is a tough elite cop of some kind (DEA maybe?)

and the hero’s wife is a police negotiator

and there is a hostage situation that escalates out of control and the criminals end up taking the wife hostage

and the hero has to rescue her while she uses her psychological skills to mess with the criminals’ heads from the inside

the wife is played by Ellen Page

and the hero is Michelle Rodriguez

TAKE MY MONEY

(via arcadiasilver)

5,956 notes

I twittered about this earlier, but sometimes it feels as though talking about misogyny in this industry is like dealing with Groundhog Day: there seems to be a continuous reset, a collective male amnesia around the issue. As if, when a woman speaks out, it’s for the first time and everyone is shocked. Just shocked, I tell you. Sexism exists? OH MY GOD.

Veteran writer Marjorie Liu on sexual harassment/misogny in the comics industry—and the collective amnesia that hits much of the industry every time the topic ever gets broached. (via robot6)

And they act like it must be an isolated case because they’ve never heard about it before (despite that women are constantly writing and talking about it) and therefore it doesn’t need to be addressed.  Part of the amnesia is that if you dismiss every instance or discussion about it as “an isolated incident” or “just some bad seeds”, then in your mind, there will never be a problem that has to be addressed.

(via ami-angelwings)

(via ami-angelwings)